UWM celebrates Black History & Liberation Month

Black History and Liberation MonthBlack History & Liberation Month at the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee offers a look into the present lives, rich history and diverse perspectives of African Americans and the African Disapora. Events are free and open to the public, unless indicated. The UWM Union is located at 2200 E. Kenwood Blvd.

Wednesday, Feb. 1
TASTE OF AFRICA
11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., Union Wisconsin Room
Celebrate the kickoff of Black History & Liberation Month by experiencing a taste of African history and culture. The program includes a sampling of traditional African foods and an African drumming and dance performance by Oma Anya. 414-229-4155.

Thursday, Feb. 2:
GASTHAUS ENTERTAINMENT SERIES PRESENTS KING SOLOMON
9-11 p.m., Union Gasthaus
King Solomon’s infectious blend of roots reggae and dancehall has a soulful vibe that will get you moving to the beat. 414-229-5567.

Mondays, Feb. 6, 13, 20 and 27, see following schedule:
SEVENTH ANNUAL AFRICAN AMERICAN FILM FESTIVAL
7 p.m., Union Theatre. 414-229-6998.

Monday, Feb. 6
“Les Amants de l’Ombre (Prohibited Love).” A Milwaukee premiere, shown in conjunction with the Festival of Films in French.

"The Black Power Mixtape,"

"The Black Power Mixtape," Feb 13

Monday, Feb. 13
“The Black Power Mixtape.” Filmmaker Göran Hugo Olsson introduces a new generation to the Black Power Movement with a cinematic and musical journey that examines the evolution of the movement from 1967-75 – through the lens of Swedish filmmakers. Combining never-before-seen 16mm footage that had been lying in the cellar of Swedish Television for the past 30 years with contemporary audio interviews with leading African American artists, activists, musicians and scholars, “Mixtape” looks at the people, society, culture and style that fueled a movement. A panel discussion will follow the screening.

Monday, Feb. 20

"Louder Than a Bomb," Feb. 20

“Louder Than A Bomb.” Each year, more than 600 teenagers from more than 60 Chicago-area schools gather for the world’s largest youth poetry slam, a competition known as “Louder Than A Bomb.” This film chronicles the stories of four teams as they prepare to compete in the 2008 event. By turns hopeful and heartbreaking, the film captures the tempestuous lives of these unforgettable kids, exploring the ways writing shapes their world, and vice versa. How and why they do it – and the community they create along the way – is at the heart of this inspiring film that is at once about the joy of being young and the pain of growing up, about finding your voice and making some noise.

Monday, Feb. 27:

"Seven Songs for Malcolm," Feb. 27

“Seven Songs for Malcolm X.” A homage to the inspirational African American civil rights leader, “Seven Songs for Malcolm X” collects testimonies, eyewitness accounts and dramatic reenactments to tell the life, legacy, loves and losses of Malcolm X. Featuring interviews with Malcolm’s widow Betty Shabazz, Spike Lee and many others, this film looks for the meaning behind the resurgence of interest in the man whose “X” always stood for the unknown.

Wednesday, Feb. 8
BLACK WOMEN IN THE ACADEMY
6 p.m., Union, room 191
A panel of distinguished scholars discusses the challenges that African American women face as educators in colleges and universities. 414-229-4641.

Wednesdays, Feb. 8 and 22
SISTA TALK
1-3 p.m., Multicultural Student Lounge (Union 198)
Sista Talk is an open discussion group for UWM women students of color and allies that provides space to talk about various issues in a supportive, safe and comfortable environment. This group is open to all students and meets every other week, alternating with the UWM Multicultural Women’s Film Series. Light refreshments will be provided. 414-229-3704.

Jon Frost Feb. 8

Jon Frost Feb. 8

Wednesday, Feb. 8
LYRICAL SANCTUARY OPEN MIC AND PERFORMANCE SERIES: JON FROST
6-8 p.m., Union Ballroom
Milwaukee’s own Jon Frost is a 27-year-old singer, songwriter and producer who all but walked away from the music industry after becoming the in-house producer for a Grammy Award-winning rapper. Despite the financial stability of working for a major label, the restrictions placed on his craft by corporate executives left him feeling less than content. Frost recently released a free EP of his upcoming album, “Can You Hear the Colors,” which features his distinctive blend of hip-hop, R&B, electronica, alternative rock and retro pop. 414-229-3894 or sociocul@uwm.edu.

Thursday, Feb. 9
THE “VOODOO” THAT WE DO: AFRICAN RELIGIONS IN THE BALANCE
12-1:30 p.m., Union, room 191
African religions provided solace to enslaved peoples in North, South and Central America, and the Caribbean. Yet these religions are denigrated as a whole, considered “less than” Judaism, Christianity and Islam. What is the truth? Presented by Patrick Bellegarde-Smith, professor emeritus of Africology. 414-229-4641.

Monday, Feb. 13
DIVERSITY: MOVING TALK TO ACTION WITH STEVE BIRDINE
7 p.m., Union Ballroom West
Join Steve Birdine, founder and CEO of Affirmations in Action, for an honest and open dialogue about diversity on campus, UWM’s Inclusive Excellence initiative and the obstacles UWM faces in creating a more open and inclusive campus environment. For more information, Joshua Parr: japarr@uwm.edu.

Wednesday, Feb. 15
MULTICULTURAL WOMEN’S FILM SERIES
Brown Bag Film and Discussion
1-3 p.m., Multicultural Student Lounge (Union 198)
“Black Is…Black Ain’t.” This ground-breaking documentary, the last one crafted by Marlon Riggs, identifies and confronts the forces that have attempted to consolidate, reduce and contain the lives and experiences of African Americans. Riggs’ film constructs a cinematic space for 10,000 ways of seeing and understanding blackness in America.

"Pieces: In My Own Voice," Feb. 15

“PIECES: IN MY OWN VOICE”
1:30 and 7 p.m., Union Wisconsin Room
Experience the darkness and the light of recovery! “Pieces,” in partnership with the National Alliance on Mental Illness – Greater Milwaukee, uses five vignettes and monologues, plus music, dance and multimedia, to illuminate the experiences of those living with mental health struggles. The play highlights issues in underserved populations, with a particular focus on the African American community. 414-229-6998.

Thursday, Feb. 16
WOMEN AND ACTIVISM SERIES: WOMEN IN THE ARTS
1-3 p.m., Bolton Hall, room 196, 3210 N. Maryland Ave.
Angela Tucker, creator of “Black Folks Don’t,” will lead an interactive workshop and lecture on social activism in media art. Approaching activism with the tools of present-day technology, Tucker explores the impact of the Web and the rhetoric of webisode caricatures. She will speak about what ideals and pathways led her to using various forms of media for social change. Participants will have the opportunity to create through dialogue, brainstorming and design activating their own ARTIVISM. 414-229-2852.

“BLACK FOLKS DON’T”
7-8:30 p.m., Union Alumni Fireside Lounge
Filmmaker and writer Angela Tucker talks about her video series “Black Folks Don’t,” which focuses on dispelling stereotypes, and discusses her experience as a black woman filmmaker. blackfolkdont.com/pages/episodes/. 414-229-5567.

Monday, Feb. 20
BLACK WOMEN IN POLITICS
6 p.m., Union Alumni Fireside Lounge
Join a conversation with African American women legislators about the past and present contributions that black women make to national and local politics. 414-229-4641.

"Hidden Colors," Feb. 22

Wednesday, Feb. 22
“HIDDEN COLORS”
6 p.m., Bolton Hall, room 150
Tariq Nasheed’s documentary tells the histories of people of color around the globe. The film examines black African institutions that had been established prior to contact with Europeans and discusses some of the reasons the contributions of African and aboriginal people have been left out of the pages of history. 414-229-5566.

Monday, Feb. 27
SISTERS LIKE ME: A RECEPTION FOR UWM WOMEN STUDENTS OF AFRICAN DESCENT
6-8 p.m., Union Alumni Fireside Lounge
UWM women students of African descent and allies are invited to come together for refreshments, socializing and community building with each other and faculty, staff and community leaders. A panel discussion will be presented, as well as information about resources and support that are available. 414-229-3704.

Wednesday, Feb. 29
MULTICULTURAL WOMEN’S FILM SERIES
Brown Bag Film and Discussion
1-3 p.m., Multicultural Student Lounge (Union, room 198)
“Sankofa.” A self-absorbed black American fashion model on a photo shoot in Africa is spiritually transported back to a plantation in the West Indies, where she experiences firsthand the physical and psychic horrors of chattel slavery, and eventually the redemptive power of community and rebellion as she becomes a member of a freedom-seeking Maroon colony. Written and directed by Haile Gerima.

Black History & Liberation Month event sponsors include: African American Academic Student Services; Black Cultural Center; Department of Africology; Department of French, Italian and Comparative Literature; Inclusive Excellence Center; Multicultural Student Coalition; Office of Diversity and Climate; Restaurant Operations and Burger King; Union Sociocultural Programming; Union Programming; Union Theatre; Women’s Resource Center.