UWM celebrates Black History & Liberation Month

“Fais Danser La Poussière (Dancing Forever).” Feb. 11

Black History & Liberation Month at UWM offers a look into the present lives, rich history and diverse perspectives of African Americans and the African Diaspora. Events are free and open to the public, unless indicated. For more information, contact Union Sociocultural Programming, 414-229-3894, sociocul@uwm.edu.

Friday, Feb. 1 and Saturday, Feb. 2

“Taste of Africa,” Feb. 4

“SHED. BLEED. A DIFFERENT COLOR”
7:30 p.m.,| Kenilworth Studios,1925 E. Kenilworth Pl.
Marquita Redd’s MFA thesis dance concert embodies the birth and emergence of black queer female consciousness. The movement and concepts are inspired by black feminist and queer theories. By exploring critical thinking about race, sexuality, and gender, the work aims to give an artistic voice to this underrepresented group, especially in the dance and art communities.

Monday, Feb. 4

TASTE OF AFRICA
11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., UWM Union, concourse, 2200 E. Kenwood Blvd.
Kick off Black History Month with a taste of African history and culture. The program includes African drumming and dance performances, along with a sampling of traditional African foods.

Feb. 4-25

8th ANNUAL AFRICAN AMERICAN FILM SERIES
7 p.m. UWM Union Theatre, 2200 E. Kenwood Blvd., second level. 414-229-4070

“Pariah.” Feb. 4

Monday, Feb. 4
 “Pariah.” Premiered at the 2011 Sundance Film Festival, “Pariah” is the feature debut from writer/director Dee Rees. We follow Alike, a Brooklyn teenager, as she searches for honest sexual expression and learns through tough trials to embrace her identity as an African-American lesbian.

Monday, Feb. 11
 “FAIS DANSER LA POUSSIÈRE (DANCING FOREVER).”

Based on Marie Dô’s autobiographical novel, the film focuses on Maya, a talented dancer, and her relationship with her unmarried Breton mother as they cope with the complexities of racism in late 1960s France. Accepted into the Alvin Ailey School, Maya moves to New York and experiences firsthand identity politics in the U.S. Faure’s camera work captures Tatiana Seguin’s performance as Maya, dazzling dance sequences choreographed by Dô and inspired improvisations. Also part of UWM’s celebration of Black History & Liberation Month.

Monday, Feb. 18
 “Nothing But a Man.”

“Nothing But a Man.” Feb. 18

Admitted into the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress and a landmark of independent filmmaking, Michael Roemer’s 1964 drama centers on Duff, a traveling railroad laborer, who romances and marries Josie, a small-town preacher’s daughter, while fighting tooth and nail to stay respected as a man.

Monday, Feb. 25
Independent filmmaker Zainebu Davis presents and discusses her work-in-progress, “Spirits of Rebellion: Black Cinema at U.C.L.A.,” a documentary about the lives and work of a small group of critically acclaimed yet relatively unknown black filmmakers and media artists known as the L.A. Rebellion. Davis also presents “Momentum: A Conversation with Black Women on Achieving Graduate Degrees.”

Tuesdays, Feb. 5 & 12

“BOONDOCKS” SCREENINGS
7 p.m., Union 240
In preparation for the Aaron McGruder lecture on Feb. 19, UWM student organizations Africology NOW and Black Graduate Student Alliance host screenings of selected episodes of McGruder’s top-rated and controversial television series “Boondocks.” The event includes discussions of prevalent themes and topics of the series. Attendees will be entered into a raffle to receive complimentary tickets to the Aaron McGruder Distinguished Lecture presentation. Light refreshments will be provided.

Wednesday, Feb. 6

SALUTE TO AFRICAN AMERICAN SERVICE IN THE U.S. MILITARY
10:30 a.m.-2 p.m., Union Ballroom
A meet-and-greet with military and students, plus a short video and guest speakers.

Thursday, Feb. 7

AFRICAN AMERICAN ALUMNI AND STUDENTS: STORIES OF EDUCATION AND SUCCESS
Golda Meier Library fourth floor Conference Center, 2311 E. Hartford Ave. 7 p.m.
Panel discussion with UWM African American alumni and current students reflecting on their experiences at UWM and its role in their personal and professional development. The event will showcase the perspectives of African American alumni interviewed for a recently completed oral history project which will be on display in the UWM Library Learning Commons throughout the month of February.

Monday, Feb. 11

FOOD JUSTICE AND COMMUNITY BUILDING
Union Alumni Fireside Lounge, 7-8:30 p.m.
This is a panel conversation around strategies for ensuring equal access to quality, healthy food for all citizens regardless of race, social class and/or geographic location. The event will showcase the work of the Fondy Farmer’s Market, Alice’s Garden, Feed the People and other local community organizations engaged in the work of building healthy and empowered communities.

Wednesday, Feb. 13

LYRICAL SANCTUARY PRESENTS HEYMISS PROGRESS
7-8 p.m. Writing workshop, Inclusive Excellence Center (Union 198); 8-10 p.m., Open mic and performance (Union Art Gallery)
The name says it all – Sabrina “Heymiss Progress” Madison. Heymiss Progress describes the aura that she brings to her poetry. A past Lyrical Sanctuary regular, she is founder of the Word Is Bond Poetry Slam Team based in Madison, Wis.

Tuesday, Feb. 19

DISTINGUISHED LECTURE SERIES
7 p.m. Union Wisconsin Room
“The Boondocks: All the Rage.” An Evening with Aaron McGruder, creator of “The Boondocks.”

“The comic strip that was often too much for newspapers has become the show that’s too much for cable television,” says a description of McGruder’s creation. During the lecture, McGruder will present the tumultuous history of The Boondocks, past and present. From the 9/11 comic strips banned in New York to the BET episodes banned from air this year, McGruder discusses the politics, themes, and characters that have so often landed him in hot water for a decade. A sign language interpreter will be provided. A reception will follow the lecture. For more information, call 414-229-3111. The Distinguished Lecture Series is sponsored by Union Programming and Union Sociocultural Programming, with other partners. Advance tickets are $5/UWM students; $8/non-UWM students; $10/UWM faculty, staff and alumni; $12/general public. Tickets may be purchased at the UWM Bookstore or by calling 414-229-4201 or 800-662-5668. Tickets at the door are $8/all students with ID; $12 UWM faculty, staff and alumni; $14/general public.

Wednesday, Feb. 20

SISTERS LIKE ME: A GATHERING IN SUPPORT OF UWM WOMEN STUDENTS OF AFRICAN DESCENT
6-8 p.m., Union Alumni Fireside Lounge
Students, faculty, staff and community allies join in celebration and support of UWM women students of African descent. Refreshments, socializing and community building before and after a panel discussion. Information about campus and community resources also will be available. For more information, contact Victoria Pryor, UWM Black Cultural Center: 414-229-3704 or pryor@uwm.edu.

PNC BANK STUDENT APPRECIATION NIGHT
7 p.m., Klotsche Center, 3409 N. Downer Ave.
UWM men’s basketball game, Panthers vs. UIC. Fun and games prior to the game.

For information, 414-229-3704.

Black History & Liberation Month sponsors at UWM include Africology Now, Black Cultural Center, Black Graduate Student Alliance, Community Media Project, Department of Africology, Festival of Films in French, History Department, LGBT Resource Center, Peck School of the Arts Dance Department, School of Information Studies, Union Sociocultural Programming, Union Theatre, UWM Libraries and the Women’s Resource Center.